Polishing Up on the Solvent-Contaminated Wipes Rule

The EPA defines a wipe as “a woven or non-woven shop towel, rag, pad, or swab made of wood pulp, fabric, cotton, polyester blends, or other material.” Regulatory guidelines for the Solvent-Contaminated Wipes Rule, also known as the “Wipes Rule,” were finalized in 2013. The purpose of this rule was to provide a consistent regulatory framework for solvent-contaminated wipes. This framework not only protects human health and the environment, but reduces compliance costs for the businesses as well.

Under the Wipes Rule, solvent-contaminated wipes sent for cleaning or disposal are conditionally excluded from hazardous waste regulation. To ensure the health and safety of all parties involved, specific guidelines have been incorporated regarding containment, disposal, and documentation of the contaminated wipes. This webinar will have a specific focus on regulations at the federal level. Just like many other compliance items, certain states will have additional guidelines that may require further action in addition to the federal guidelines.

On April 25, 2020, our webinar will dive into different facets of the “Wipes Rule” in hopes of bringing peace of mind to the hard-working individuals who use, reuse, and dispose of them.

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